A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post about my trials and tribulations of buying running sneakers.  I can’t seem to get the right fit and no one seems to know what to recommend.  I walk into a running store and am helped by  inexperienced salespeople who sell me the wrong shoes.

I posted a comment on LinkedIn on a running group and got some advice, which I wanted to share with you:

  • Unless you are an experienced runner, the sales process should always start with a biomechanical assessment and the salesperson should never take the person’s word for it when they say they pronate. Most people don’t really know what that means and even if they do.
  • Some form of gait analysis is essential in choosing shoes. If not you may as well make a choice based on the colour of the shoe.
  • So many running injuries are due to form. Running stores should look at the way you run but rarely recommend changing the way you run. It is easier to put you in the shoe they feel good about. There is a wave of runners embracing lower drop and no drop shoes that help facilitate a healthier gait. Odds are unless you ask about this type of shoe the sales person will not bring it out……..
I also received numerous emails and comments on Twitter (@hilary25). I decided that I was going to try a barefoot running shoe.  Someone recommended New Balance and you know what, after weeks of running in them, I actually love them.  They are not cushiony and have little support.  The toe is wide and the heal is pretty snug.  I find myself running faster and stronger.
For months, my running partner kept telling me to switch to barefoot running shoes and I just couldn’t get myself to do it.  Since I’ve been running in these shoes, I’ve found that I’m getting less shin splints, less problems with my heal and achilles.
Love to hear your thoughts on this.  Thanks in advance for sharing!

————–

DISCLOSURE: NO CONNECTION, UNPAID, MY OWN OPINIONS
I have not received any compensation for writing this content and I have no material connection to the brands, topics and/or products that are mentioned herein. However, individual links could be associated with affiliate marketing sites and through the use of affiliate links contained herein, I may collect fees from purchases made.